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Overview

National Immigration Law Center
Map: State Laws and Policies on Access to Higher Education for Immigrants

Illinois Dream Act

Illinois Student Assistance Commission
Illinois DREAM Act information from ISAC

Illinois Dream Fund
Scholarships for Undocumented Students

Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights
Illinois DREAM Act, Undocumented Student Guide to College (PDF)
Consolidated List of Scholarships and Resources Available to Students Regardless of Immigration Status (PDF)
 Guide to College Planning for Illinois Students (PDF)
Suspending the deportation of DREAM students – Fact Sheets
Dream Relief

Educators for Fair Consideration
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Federal Dream Act

National Immigration Law Center
DREAM Act: Summary
THE DREAM ACT: Good for Illinois’ Economy; Good for Illinois’ Future

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Educators For Fair Consideration (E4FC)
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Resources
DACA Educator Toolkit

Own the DREAM
What is DACA?

Illinois Tuition Equity Law

Although some states have begun to bar students from enrolling in public universities and community colleges, no federal law prohibits colleges and universities from offering admission to undocumented students. However, undocumented students are not eligible to receive federal or state aid (Texas and New Mexico are exceptions).

Undocumented students may be eligible to receive privately funded merit scholarships or grant aid. Illinois is one of a number of states with a tuition equity bill, Public Act 093-0007, also referred to as House Bill 60, which was signed into law in 2003. This legislation permits undocumented students to pay in-state tuition rates at all public colleges and universities provided they meet the following requirements:

  1. The individual resided with his or her parent or guardian while attending a public or private high school in Illinois.
  2. The individual graduated from a public or private high school or received the equivalent of a high school diploma in Illinois.
  3. The individual attended school in Illinois for at least 3 years as of the date the individual graduated from high school or received the equivalent of a high school diploma.
  4. In the case of an individual who is not a citizen or a permanent resident of the United States, the individual provides the University with an affidavit stating that the individual will file an application to become a permanent resident of the United States at earliest opportunity the individual is eligible to do so.
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